Friday, May 11, 2007

Cool Cake Animation


Some great squashy-stretchy claymation in here, set to the music of "La Traviata". Probably doesn't taste as good as it looks!

5 comments:

  1. Best polish I've ever seen on stop motion. A work of love.

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  2. Wow! That's some true patience and passionate finesse! How long do you think that took? They must have planned that one out to the bone!

    -Hobbie

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  3. It would be cool if they did some sort of opera Fantasia with claymation.

    Beautifully done! I love the Stop Motion feel of it!

    Hey Victor, Im a student at AM, I've been reading your blog for some time.

    Youre an awesome animator!

    Sant

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  4. Wow, that's so awesome. Thanks for link.

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  5. This is beautiful in both concept and execution, and I'm grateful for the opportunity to see this short. Although I have to say I find it a bit frustrating when I see wonderful work on such sites as youtube, dailymotion, etc. and still am not sure who should be credited.

    So, for those who care to know, this is what I have found after a little google translation and google web search:

    Director is Belgium born animator Guionne Leroy

    Filmography of short films:

    * Délit de Fuite (1987)
    * Chiquechoque (1988)
    * l'Humeur (1988)
    * Jeux De Mains (1989)
    * Tango (1989)
    * Démélés (1990)
    * Tagada et Fugue (1991)
    * La Traviata (1992)
    * Arthur (1997) (court métrage)
    * Des rois qui voulaient plus qu'une couronne (2003) 43 min

    And has also worked on:

    * Toy Story (1995)
    * James and the Giant Peach (1996)
    * Chicken Run (2000)

    "La Traviata" was included on a DVD titled "The Imaginary Opera" which unfortunately is no longer available. Guionnne Leroy authored a brief article on AWN about his process for working on a short with a tiny budget:

    http://www.awn.com/mag/issue2.5/2.5pages/2.5leroycamera.html

    I wish it was easier for audiences to get their hands on works such as these in a way that also supports the artist... which more often than not, youtube and its ilk do not.

    -Erik

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